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Aug 292018
 

The East Cooper Breakfast Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, September 4th, 2018 at 7:30 a.m. in The Cooper River Room at the Mount Pleasant Waterfront Park. We are pleased to have our president Tripp Hoover and our secretary and fundraising chair Sean O’Connor, speak to the club about our upcoming annual fundraiser. Breakfast catered by Dish and Design Catering and Events.

http://eastcooperspeakeasy.com/

Join us for an evening of 1920’s Prohibition-era fun. Heavy hors d’oeuvres, open bar, dancing to jazz and swing music, games, a silent auction with themed packages.

~ $100 entry includes food, open bar, and raffle ticket ~

Bring a non-perishable food donation and receive an extra turn playing one of the games and increase your chances to win great prizes!

Open only to 21+

Jun 132018
 

Join us Saturday, October 13, 2018 for an evening of 1920’s Prohibition-Era Fun.

When: 7:00-11:00 pm

Where: Sweetgrass Event Center:

2125 Highway 17 N.
Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

What: Heavy hors d’oeuvres, open bar, dancing to jazz and swing DJ music with the Charleston Swing Dance Association, games, and a silent auction with themed packages.

~ $100 entry includes food, open bar, and raffle ticket

Open only to 21+

Why: The evening benefits Rotary Charities as well as East Cooper Community Outreach and East Cooper Meals on Wheels

 

 

 

 

Find out more information on the event website: http://eastcooperspeakeasy.com/

Apr 112018
 

East Cooper Breakfast Rotary Club President Stephanie Bates presented East Cooper Community Outreach Executive Director Stephanie Kelley with a $5000 donation that the Club raised through their efforts from the East Cooper Speakeasy – Prohibition for a Cause event last October.
This years East Cooper Speakeasy is set for Saturday, October 13, 2018. For information visit www.eastcooperspeakeasy.com

 

Mar 212018
 

President Stephanie Bates presented My Sister’s House Director of Development and Marketing Tonya Pilkenton with a $5000 donation that the Club raised through their efforts from the East Cooper Speakeasy – Prohibition for a Cause event last October. This year’s East Cooper Speakeasy is set for Saturday, October 13, 2018. For information visit www.eastcooperspeakeasy.com.

Jul 072016
 

Sign up as a Speakeasy Sponsor by July 15th

and we’ll make sure your name is added to the printed posters

that will be distributed throughout East Cooper by August 1st.

Sponsors will be accepted after July 15th

but no guarantee they’ll make it onto the poster.

 

BECOME A SPONSOR

 

PRESENTING SPONSORS

Mt Pleasant Dermatology

Louis and Grace DeWolff Foundation

TABLE SPONSORS

Stubbs Muldrow Herin Architects

Elmire Raven and the Board of Directors on behalf of My Sister’s House, Inc. 

FLAPPERS AND GANGSTAS

Wayne Cassaday

Michelle Whitbeck, MBA, Keller Williams Realtor

McGuire & Co. LLC

Jun 212016
 

FlapperIn preparation for the Speakeasy – Prohibition for a Cause event,

we present this Speakeasy Minute article to share with you what it was like to live in the 1920’s.

eastcooperspeakeasy.com

FLAPPERS

Not all women of the Prohibition era were flappers, but there were a good many to be found in Speakeasys. “Flapper” is a nickname given to young women in the 1920’s who defied convention by refusing to use corsets, cutting their hair short, and wearing short skirts, as well as by behavior such as drinking and smoking in public.

The slang word ‘flapper’ describing a young woman, is sometimes supposed to refer to a young bird flapping its wings while learning to fly. However, it may derive from an earlier use in northern England to mean ‘teenage girl’, referring to one whose hair is not yet put up and whose plaited pigtail flapped on her back; or from an older word meaning prostitute. The slang word ‘flap’ was used for a young prostitute as early as 1631. By the 1890s, the word ‘flapper’ was emerging in England as popular slang both for a very young prostitute, and in a more general – and less derogatory sense – of any lively mid-teenage girl.

By 1908, newspapers as serious as The Times used it, although with careful explanation: ‘flapper’, we may explain, is a young lady who has not yet been promoted to long frocks and the wearing of her hair “up”.

Women finally won the right to vote in the United States on August 26, 1920. Women wanted to be men’s social equals. They wanted to be treated as a man and go smoking and drinking. Also, many women had more working opportunity and even taken the male jobs, who became doctor, lawyer, engineer and pilots. The rise of consumerism promoted the ideals of fulfillment and freedom; that encouraged women to have their own thoughts on garments, career, social activities.

Jun 142016
 

phactjazz4In preparation for the Speakeasy – Prohibition for a Cause event,

we present this Speakeasy Minute article to share with you what it was like to live in the 1920’s.

eastcooperspeakeasy.com

The 1920s era went by such names as the Jazz Age, the Age of Intolerance, the Roaring Twenties, and the Age of Wonderful Nonsense. This was the beginning of modern America.   It was a period of sustained economic prosperity with a distinctive cultural edge. Because, by the end of 1918, the country had not only survived a deadly worldwide influenza epidemic but World War I was over.  Most Americans felt hopeful and cheerful.  This was an age of dramatic social and political change.  For the first time, more Americans lived in cities than on farms. The nation’s total wealth more than doubled between 1920 and 1929.  This economic growth swept many Americans into an affluent but unfamiliar “consumer society.”  Thanks to nationwide advertising and the spread of chain stores, people from coast to coast bought the same goods, listened to the same music, did the same dances and even used the same slang.  Many Americans were uncomfortable with this new, urban, sometimes racy “mass culture”; in fact, for many–even most–people in the United States, the 1920s brought more conflict than celebration. However, for a small handful of young people in the nation’s big cities, the 1920s were roaring indeed.

At the beginning of the roaring twenties, the United States was converting from a wartime to peacetime economy. When weapons for World War I were no longer needed, there was a temporary stall in the economy. After a few years, the country prospered. In this decade, America became the richest nation on Earth and a culture of consumerism was born. It was the time of the $5 workday, good worker pay for those days. People spent money for better roads, tourism, and holiday resorts. Real estate booms, most notably in Florida, sent land prices soaring.  Canned foods, ready-made clothing and household appliances liberated women from much household drudgery. The influence of Ford`s methods of mass production and efficiency enabled other industries to produce a huge variety of consumer appliances.

The roaring twenties ushered in a rich period of American writing, distinguished by the works of such authors as Sinclair Lewis, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Carl Sandburg and Ernest Hemingway.

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